Changing Career Paths? Tips on Recreating Your Resume

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Change career

  • Have a clear objective

            When changing career paths it is imperative that you are very clear, with a few sentences, why you are changing career paths and what you hope to gain. Explain this briefly and efficiently so the reader can immediately get a feel of what you are trying to accomplish.

  • Spotlight the new career

           Say for example you are a landscaper and you want to get a new job in product manufacturing, at first glance it looks as if landscaping and product manufacturing have nothing in common. Look closer my friend. One thing that could be said and transferred over to the new career would be foresight/imagination for designing something before any work is actually done. In many fields of work (apparel design, engineering, architect, etc.) having a productive imagination is often the first step to even being able to properly and successfully perform the job. You want to take the focus of all of your past experience, achievements, awards, etc., and explain how what you did will transfer over into a new career field.

  • Make the resume for the job you want, not the job you have

              Changing careers is most definitely a scary ordeal that will in no doubt change your life, for better or worse. Most people that have careers that they don’t really like or that leaves them unfulfilled, decide to keep those jobs because it is financially stable and they are accustomed to the work. Really cant blame them because making such a drastic life change is scary. There might be many reasons you are deciding to make that career change, it could be that your dream job was always in another field or your you current work field doesn’t give you the chance to expand and move up the corporate latter. Whatever the reason might be you will no doubt need to renovate your resume so when your new employer gets a hand on it, they will be caught breathless from you resume redo.

  • Bring light to your supplementary activities  

               This is the point where you want to bring attention to all of you “out of work” activities, that are either relevant to the new job or displays your strong qualities. If you are going for a managerial role in the new job you want to make sure you talk about volunteering or an internship where you had to display or learned the leadership skills that you can apply to your new career.

“You want to take the focus of all of your past experience, achievements, awards, etc., and explain how what you did will transfer over into a new career field.”

  • Your new cover letter

                 Now that you are on your way to getting that new career you’ve had your eye on, you need to make sure you revamp your cover letter as well. This is probably the most important part of a resume from someone that is doing the “big career change”. In the cover letter this is the perfect opportunity to elaborate on yourself and mention how you are switching career paths. Talk about the skills you currently have that will translate over into this new career, as you already know experience is priceless when it comes to getting a new job.

  • Keep it short

                 Don’t make the mistake of stuffing your resume with random non-relevant things to make yourself seem like a more feasible candidate. A hiring manager doesn’t want to see irrelevant information. Statistics show that resumes that are one page long get read in their entirety 64% more than non-one page resumes. So make sure you have very crucial info about yourself, your skills and accomplishments in the resume but remember to also keep it short and sweet and straight to the point.

 

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